• Grilled Butterflied Silver Star Farm Leg of Lamb, Grilled Polenta and Kohlrabi Slaw

    For the Polenta:
    3 cups milk
    3 cups vegetable stock
    1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
    Kosher salt and fresh ground pepper
    2 cups, coarse ground polenta
    4 ounces butter
    1/2 cup fresh oregano, coarsely chopped

    Directions:
    Place the milk, vegetable stock, olive oil, salt, pepper and polenta in a sauce pot. Bring to a boil while stirring constantly. Lower the heat to a slow boil and cook while stirring until the polenta thickens, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and add the butter and oregano. Stir until well incorporated and pour into a non-reactive 8” x 12” baking pan. Spread evenly and let cool until firm. Cut into 8 rectangles and then cut the rectangles in half to form triangles.

    Heat a griddle over high heat until drops of water sizzle on the surface. Brush with olive oil and place the triangles on. Cook for about 3 minutes on each side or until nicely browned. Arrange on a platter and keep warm until ready to serve.

    For the Kohlrabi Slaw:
    4 medium kohlrabi, washed, peeled and cut into julienne* matchsticks on the mandolin.
    2 Granny Smith apples, washed, peeled and cut into julienne matchsticks on the mandolin.
    2 tablespoons fresh squeezed lemon juice
    2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
    2 tablespoons Italian parsley, washed, drained and coarsely chopped

    Place all ingredients in a non-reactive* bowl and toss together until well incorporated. Set aside until ready to serve.

    For the Leg of Lamb:
    4-pound boneless leg of lamb, butterflied and pounded to an even thickness

    Marinade:
    1/2 cup mint leaves washed, drained and coarsely chopped
    1 jalapeno pepper, halved with seeds removed, coarsely chopped
    2-inch piece of ginger, peeled
    6 garlic cloves, peeled
    4 tablespoons apricot jam
    2 tablespoons tamari
    1/4 cup dry sherry

    Directions:
    Place all marinade ingredients in a blender and puree until smooth. Place lamb in a Pyrex baking dish and pour the marinade over. Flip the lamb a few times to be sure that it is well coated. Cover with plastic and place in the refrigerator. Flip the lamb in platter every 2 hours and leave overnight.

    Prepare a charcoal grill* for indirect cooking. Place all the coals on one side of the grill with a pan of water on the other side. Remove the lamb from the marinade and towel dry. Reserve the marinade. Lightly oil the grate over the coals and place the lamb on the grill directly over the coals. Brown on each side for 5 to 6 minutes on each side. Then move the lamb to the side of the grill opposite of the coals. Brush the lamb with the marinade. Place the cover on the grill with the open vent over the lamb. Cook for 20 to 40 minutes to desired doneness, basting every 10 minutes. An internal temperature of 125 degrees will give you a medium-rare product. Once cooked, remove from the grill and place on a carving board. Let rest for 15 minutes before slicing. Arrange the slices on a platter and use the juices from the carving board and platter as a sauce.

    • *Epicurean Tip
      Julienned Vegetables

      Julienne is an attractive way to prepare vegetables for a special meal. Also called a “matchstick” cut, a julienne is 1/8 x 1/8 x 2-3 inches in length. To prepare a julienne, trim the ends and sides of the vegetable to make a rectangular shape, then make uniform-size cuts at 1/8 inch intervals. Trim the julienne to the desired length and compost the remaining small ends, or use them for stock.

    • *Epicurean Tip
      Non-reactive Pans

      Non-reactive cookware will not react to acid ingredients, such as citrus. When a recipe calls for a non-reactive pot, pan or bowl, use stainless steel, clay, enamel, glass, or plastic.

    • *Epicurean Tip
      Light Your (Grill) Fire!

      Avoid using lighter fluid to start your coals; it could add an unwanted taste to anything you grill. Better options:

      1. Use a Chimney. This tool takes some practice, but once you figure how many sheets of old newspaper it takes to get your charcoals started, it is very efficient.
      2. Use an electric starter. Several types are available – one type uses an electronically heated coil that you place in your grill and cover with charcoal. Another type, which resembles a hair drier, uses electronically heated coils and a fan that blows an airstream heated to 1256 degrees Fahrenheit to fire up your coals. Another similar lighter incorporates batteries and butane to create a 2600 degree Fahrenheit airstream.
      3. Use a propane starter. Smoker-cooker gurus are using propane fire starters that can deliver 3000 degree Fahrenheit flames to get their coals going. This tool is for those who just can’t wait to start grilling or smoking!